The spirit of surfing runs deep in Newy | PHOTOS Surf’s Up: Cars at Merewether Beach, ready to head to a contest at Catho in 1965.
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A surfer between Bar Beach and Dixon Park Beach in 2017.

A surfer between Bar Beach and Dixon Park Beach in 2017.

Nine Mile Beach Surfboard Club members in the 1960s.

Nine Mile Beach Surfboard Club members in the 1960s.

Surfest in 1990.

Mark Richards.

Mark Richards surfing at the Billabong Pro at Waimea Bay in December 1986.

Merewether surfer Ross Bailey off the rocks at Merewether in 1966. Photo by John Nute.

Surfers at Bar Beach in 1960.Picture: Surfin Newie 1956-2009.

Image from the Surfin Newey exhibition in 2010. Picture: STUART QUINN .

Image from the Surfin Newey exhibition in 2010. Picture: STUART QUINN

TweetFacebookNewy,Newie or Newks?As you can see, we used the word Newy in the headline.

The natives get restless over the perennial Newy-Newie debate.

The truth of the matter is, we were struggling to find a good headline and deadline was approaching like a freight train.

It’s also true that we used this word to deliberately annoy people. You may not realise it, but we’re helping you out. We’re helping you get a bit of that deep-seated anger out of your system. Giving you an outlet, as such. No need for thanks. It’s part of our service.

We noticed Newcastle lord mayor Nuatali Nelmes raised the old Newy-Newie chestnut recently.

“Following a recent council meeting, a bit of casual banter between councillor Carol Duncan and deputy lord mayor Declan Clausen about the correct spelling of an abbreviation of Newcastle as ‘Newy’ or ‘Newie’ led me to test it out on Facebook,”Nua said.

“The post certainly sparked a passionate debate with over 1800 comments responding to the question. For the record, I’m firmly in the ‘Newy’ camp!”

Nua also pointed out that Mikey Robins, a born and bred Novocastrian, used to refer to Newcastle as ‘Newks’ on Triple J.

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ON FIRE: Ben Simmons shoots over the top of Detroit Pistons forward Stanley Johnson during the 76ers’ 97-86 win on Tuesday. Picture: AP
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BEN Simmons went to the same US college as Shaquille O’Neal and now the Newcastle-raised guard shares an NBA record with the Basketball Hall Of Famer.

Simmons on Tuesday became the first player since O’Neal (11) to open his NBA career with four straight double-doubles.

Triple-double ✔️Victory ✔️Ben Simmons propels the @sixers to win in Detroit! #NBARookspic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/dgiFbj2TFy

— NBA (@NBA) October 24, 2017Ben Simmons hype after going coast to coast against Avery Bradley and finishing over Drummond #nbapic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/0W9VcEx4m5

— All Ball (@allballapp) October 24, 2017Ben Simmons is the first player since Shaquille O’Neal to record a double-double in each of his first 4 career games. pic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/E6nRxE9CTY

— ESPN Stats & Info (@ESPNStatsInfo) October 24, 2017Ben Simmons! 🔥pic.twitter苏州夜总会招聘/ivrHQpCqYI

— MyNBAUpdate (@MyNBAUpdate) October 24, 2017

With the world watching in anticipation, Simmons scored18 points and secured10 rebounds on debut in a 120-115 loss to the Washington Wizards less than a week ago.

He hasn’t stopped. The silky-skilled big man dropped 11 points to go with 11 boards in a 102-92 loss to Boston and added 18 points and 10 rebounds in a 128-94 defeat to Toronto.

The 76ers play the Houston Rockets in Texas on Friday.

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Ben Simmons has led the Philadelphia 76ers to their first regular season win with a history-making triple-double that places him alongside basketball greats Oscar Robertson and Charles Barkley in the NBA history books.

The 21-year-old from Melbourne, in just his fourth NBA game, was superb with 21 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists in the 97-86 win against the Detroit Pistons.

The n shrugged off the personal accolades and focused on his team’s maiden win.

“It feels great that we won,” Simmons said.

“Our team played well together and we played the right way.

“I’m just happy we got our first one.”

The 76ers, despite high expectations, opened the NBA regular season with losses in their first three games.

Simmons and centre Joel Embiid, with 30 points and nine rebounds, were too strong for a Pistons squad that falls to a two-win, two-loss season record.

Just two other players, Robertson and Art “Hambone” Williams, have achieved triple-doubles in their first four games.

Simmons also became the first player to achieve the feat in Detroit’s new Little Caesars Arena and became the first 76ers rookie since Michael Carter-Williams to post a triple-double.

He also became the first 76ers player since Barkley in 1987 to shoot more than 70 per cent from the field in a triple-double with eight of his 11 shots successful.

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Coal and Allied has avoided prosecution over a 2014 incident at a Hunter Valley mine that left a man severely injured.
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The NSW Department of Planning announced on Tuesday that it had agreed to an“enforceable undertaking” with the mine operator, which would cost the company $677,000, in response to an alleged breachof the Workplace Health and Safety Act.

The legally-binding agreement, proposed by Coal and Allied, comes after a worker at the Mt Thorley Warkworth mine fell from a ladder while cleaning the window of a grader on October 4.

The department’s official decision to accept Coal and Allied’s alternative to prosecution, which was published on Tuesday, said the man fell from a height of 1.5 metres after an opening door caused the ladder to move –which left the man with “very serious injuries”.

The department’s regulator began prosecution against Coal and Allied’s parent company Rio Tinto, alleging a workplace health and safety breach that carried a maximum penalty of $1.5 million.

But instead, Coal and Allied will undertake a range of actions –on top of the estimated $500,000 the company has already spent addressing the alleged breach.

“This case serves as a timely reminder to mining operators of their obligations under theWork Health and Safety Act,” NSW Resources Regulator chief compliance officer AnthonyKeon said.

“The undertaking by Coal and Allied is considered significant, and rightfully so, and has thereal potential to create considerable, and broad, industry reach by focusing on the nextgeneration of workers in the mining and other high-risk industries.”

A key project that’s part of the enforceable action is aneducational program aimed at school leavers, involving a short film and a smart phone application.

It will be trialled at two Hunter schools.

In a statement on Tuesday, the department said it believed the action “provided for significantly better outcomes than prosecution alone would achieve”.

Rio Tinto sold Coal and Allied to Yancoal earlier this year.

A Yancoal spokesman said the project was a chance to influence the thinking and behaviour of young people, with regard to safety, before they enter the workplace.

“The enforceable undertaking has been developed in the best interests of instituting an education program to help prevent injuries among young people when they enter the workforce,” he said.

“The more safety information and experiences we can provide prior to entering into a heavy industry such as mining, the more vigilant they can be.

“Ultimately any education program must be supported by a workplace culture committed to zero harm.”

TheConstruction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union hasbeen contacted for comment.

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – OCTOBER 04: A general view of Sydney Road in Brunswick on October 4, 2016 in Melbourne, . (Photo by Vince Caligiuri/Fairfax Media) Generic tram, trams, traffic, bike lane, city skyline, congestionAutomatic dispensing machines would replace pharmacies, low-value healthcare procedures would be defunded, people with real-world skills would be made teachers, and drivers would be charged for the use of roads under a series of audacious proposals the Productivity Commission believes could add $80 billion per year to economic growth – an amount it says would grow over time.
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The five-year program, requested by the Treasurer Scott Morrison, is designed to jump-start innate, or so-called “multifactor” productivity, which the commission believes has barely grown since 2004.

The productivity boost brought about by economic reforms in the 1990s produced almost all of the decade’s spectacular lift in living standards. Since 2004 innate productivity growth has produced almost none, with most of the productivity growth that has been achieved the result of investment spending and most of the income growth the result of the mining boom.

Productivity Commission chairman Peter Harris said the slowdown in ‘s capacity to “do more with the same” was puzzling because scientific and technological knowledge had seemingly advanced. In 2003 there was no “cloud”, no “internet of things” or smartphones and music and software were provided in physical forms.

Without action to remove the last big obstacles to productivity, might consign itself to half a century of low income growth.

The obstacles were predominantly in the public sector, in the way it provided health and education and managed cities. It was as ripe for reform now as manufacturing was in the 1980s.

Twenty seven per cent of adults were obese, holding back their ability to contribute to the labour force, although ns life expectancy was the third-highest in the developed world, the 11 years spent in ill-health was the third worst in the OECD.

Medical best-practice was often ignored. Seventy five per cent of bronchitis was treated with antibiotics, when the correct rate was close to zero, 71,087 knee arthroscopies were performed per year in most cases without evidence of benefits, 27,500 hysterectomies were performed without a diagnosis of cancer. Often it was because doctors didn’t know how to say “no” to patients, and because patients didn’t know what best practice was.

The commission recommends defunding low value procedures and creating scorecards for the performance of providers to enable patients to compare outcomes.

Medicines would be dispensed by ATM-style machines or by staff without pharmacist qualifications. “This new model would not, under any realistic assumptions require anywhere near the current 20,000 pharmacists who provide clinical services, and so would require a transition to a much smaller employment base,” the commission says. Universities would be informed of the need for fewer pharmacists, some of whom could transition to other forms of medical work assisting doctors. The new dispensaries would not be bound by the location rules that prevent pharmacies from competition.

The Pharmacy Guild – one of the country’s most powerful lobby groups – instantly rejected the recommendation as “radical and unworkable”, saying it would “dumb down” an entire profession.

The commission wants universities to provide honest assessments of the employability of their graduates before enrolment and to be subject to competition law where they could be made to provide refunds or replacement courses.

“If you buy a kettle and it doesn’t perform, you’ve got the right to return it and get a new kettle,” Mr Harris said launching the report. “If your education doesn’t perform as promised, the same law should apply.”

Mr Harris said one-in-five university graduates were underemployed, up from one-in-10 a decade ago. His report discusses, but does not recommend, stopping fees imposed for university teaching being used to fund university research.

The report imposes a five-year timeframe for lifting teaching standards, noting that the performance of 15-year-olds in maths has slipped to the level of 14-year-olds in the year 2000. It says 30 per cent of year 7 to 10 information technology teachers have neither studied the subject at second???year tertiary level nor been trained in how to teach it at tertiary level.

“Fifteen-year-olds are being taught by people who may not necessarily know the subject and can’t answer questions because it’s not their field,” Mr Harris said.

One solution was to “take people who aren’t necessarily trained teachers and train them up”. Another was to train teachers in specialist fields such as maths and IT.

Other recommendations include phasing out stamp duties in favour of land tax and trialing pay-peer-drive charges for roads as an alternative to petrol excise.

“None of these ideas are new, we didn’t make them up,” Mr Harris said. “But when people tell you they are already being implemented, don’t believe them. That’s what we are trying to achieve.”

Mr Morrison said he would work with the states on the ideas, beginning with the treasurers’ conference on Friday.

– with Adam Gartrell

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West Indies’ Cricket player Dwayne Smith arrives at the NSW Supreme Court in Sydney on October 24, 2017. Smith is a witness on the Chris Gayle vs. Fairfax trial. (Photo by Daniel Munoz/Fairfax Media)
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West Indies’ Cricket player Chris Gayle (right) arrives at the NSW Supreme Court in Sydney on October 24, 2017. (Photo by Daniel Munoz/Fairfax Media)

West Indies cricketer Chris Gayle’s teammate Dwayne Smith has admitted he texted the word “sexy” to a female massage therapist a day before she alleges Gayle exposed himself to her in a Sydney dressing room while Smith was present.

But Smith told the NSW Supreme Court on Tuesday Gayle had not exposed himself to the woman and “that’s something you would remember” if it did happen.

Gayle is suing Fairfax Media for defamation over a series of articles published in The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Canberra Times between January 6 and January 9 last year which alleged he exposed himself to a team massage therapist during the 2015 Cricket World Cup.

Gayle, 38, gave evidence on Monday that the incident did not happen and the “heartbreaking” allegations were “the most hurtful thing I’ve actually come across in my entire life”.

Fairfax Media is defending the stories on two bases, including that the allegations are true.

The woman at the centre of the stories, massage therapist Leanne Russell, is expected to give evidence on Wednesday.

Gayle’s teammate Smith was present in the dressing room in Drummoyne in Sydney’s inner west at the time of the alleged incident on February 11, 2015.

During a brief stint in the witness box on Tuesday, Smith said repeatedly the alleged incident “did not happen”.

The court has heard the West Indies team received an email from team operations manager Sir Richie Richardson on February 12, 2015, saying Ms Russell had “encountered a few uncomfortable situations with members of the team” and reminding them to treat her with respect.

Smith denied reading or receiving the email and Gayle gave evidence on Monday he did not believe it referred to him.

Fairfax’s barrister, Matthew Collins, QC, asked Smith if he texted the word “sexy” to Ms Russell on February 10, a day before the alleged incident.

“I don’t recall,” Smith replied.

After he was shown a copy of the message, he accepted that he sent it to Ms Russell.

When it was put to him that he sent the text to Ms Russell while she was massaging him at the InterContinental Hotel in Sydney that afternoon, Smith said it could have been “a minute before”.

Asked if he had given “false evidence” about the alleged incident involving Gayle because he was “seeking to protect” his teammate, Smith replied: “What I said is true.”

“You yourself put Ms Russell in an uncomfortable position the day before on the 10th of February,” Dr Collins said.

“No I did not,” Smith replied.

Dr Collins told the four-person jury that Ms Russell would give evidence she was “devastated” to have been treated in such a “demeaning and disrespectful manner” by Gayle and “burst into tears” after leaving the dressing room.

Chloe Saltau, sports editor at The Age, gave evidence on Tuesday that Ms Russell contacted her on Facebook on January 5, 2016.

She said they did not socialise with one another but Ms Russell “was a work colleague of my husband”.

Ms Saltau said Ms Russell had told her she contacted her to “show support for [sports reporter] Mel McLaughlin and other women in sport” following Gayle’s famous “don’t blush baby” interview with Ms McLaughlin in January 2016.

Ms Saltau agreed to keep Ms Russell’s identity secret in the report. She told the court she believed it was “reasonable” to do so in the circumstances.

Bruce McClintock, SC, asked Ms Saltau if it crossed her mind Ms Russell might have been “a fabulist inclined to invent things”.

“I didn’t think that about her at all, no,” Ms Saltau said.

The court heard Ms Russell had told Ms Saltau there was another player in the room at the time of the alleged incident but did not reveal his identity.

“The fact is I didn’t know who he was so I couldn’t take steps to contact him,” Ms Saltau said.

“I believed that there were other ways of verifying the story, which is why we went to Richie Richardson and asked him for comment.”

Mr McClintock put it to Ms Saltau that the report was “disgracefully bad journalism, wasn’t it”.

“No, I disagree with that. It was a legitimate story,” Ms Saltau replied.

She denied “cutting corners” or being “frantic” to get the story out in the wake of the Mel McLaughlin interview.

The Herald’s chief sports reporter, Chris Barrett, gave evidence on Tuesday he approached Sir Richie Richardson about the story.

“Richie said he didn’t want to comment on that or …the [Mel McLaughlin] incident in Hobart,” Mr Barrett said.

“He was surprised, I suppose … He appeared alarmed that I had that information.”

The trial continues.

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